Developing the Lucida 3D Scanner

The scanner was developed by the Spanish artist and engineer Manuel Franquelo with Factum Arte and Factum Foundation. The first iteration of the Lucida – a two-camera laser system employing linear guides for vertical and horizontal movement in 48 x 48 cm ‘tiles’ – was first used in 2011 to record the preparatory panels for the Triumph of the Eucharist by Peter Paul Rubens at the Prado Museum (Madrid).

Visualising & Rematerialising Lucida Data

The Lucida 3D Scanner reveals what the texture of an object looks like without colour. It is a close-range, non-contact 3D recording system that captures high-resolution data (up to 100μm) of the fine surface relief of paintings and other low-relief objects.

Recording with the Lucida 3D Scanner

The Lucida 3D Scanner reveals what the texture of an object looks like without colour. It is a close-range, non-contact 3D recording system that captures high-resolution data (up to 100μm) of the fine surface relief of paintings and other low-relief objects.

Small Objects Scanner

The Small Objects Scanner is a photogrammetry rig designed to 3D scan objects up to 30 cm tall. The idea for the scanner was conceived following Factum’s work to record the many small fragments from the tomb of Seti I (Luxor) that are dispersed in various museums around the world – it was a time-consuming and laborious process. The end result of this research and development project will be a mechanised photogrammetry rig capable of efficiently recording large numbers of delicate small objects and only a minimal knowledge of photogrammetry will be required to operate the scanner.

Selene Photometric Stereo System

Since 2017, Factum Foundation has been developing a new surface scanning system and workflow designed specifically for the fine surface texture of flat or semi-flat surfaces such as paintings, murals or sculptural bas-reliefs. While the Lucida 3D Scanner still produces the highest level of detail, the Photometric Stereo System has the additional advantage of acquiring both surface information and colour at the same time.